THOMAS CHANDLER HALIBURTON

The Clockmaker, or the sayings and doings of Samuel Slick of Slickville

By Thomas Chandler Haliburton

Haliburton was born in Windsor, Nova Scotia, the son of William Hersey Otis Haliburton and Lucy Chandler Grant. He attended University of King’s College in Windsor and became a lawyer, opening a practice in Annapolis Royal. While in England, he met Louisa Neville, whom he married in 1816 and brought back to Nova Scotia. Louisa died in 1840.

With his wry wit and Yankee voice, Sam Slick of Slicksville put forward his views on “human nature” in a regular column in the Novascotian, beginning in 1835. The twenty-one sketches were published in a collection titled The Clockmaker, or the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick of Slicksville, First Series in 1836, supplemented by an additional 12 unpublished or new sketches. The book was Canada‘s first international bestseller and was hugely popular, not only in Nova Scotia but also in Britain and the United States (Wikipedia)

“Sam, says he atakin’ hold of my hand, you was always right up and down, and as straight as a shingle in your dealings. I can trust you, I know, but mind – and he put his finger on his lips – mums is the word; by gones are by gones; you wouldn’t blow an old chum among friends, would you?  I scorn a nasty, dirty, mean action, says I, as I do a nigger.”

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Slick’s wise-cracking commentary on the colonial life of Nova Scotia and relations with the U.S. and Britain struck a note with readers, leading to a second series in 1838 and a third in 1840. The satirical sketches, mocking both Canadians and Americans, made Haliburton one of the most popular writers of comic fiction in English of that era. The Clockmaker (which was also translated into German) established Haliburton as one of the founders of North American humour.

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, later George Gordon Noel, 6th Baron Byron, FRS (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), commonly known simply as Lord Byron, was a British poet and a leading figure in Romanticism. Amongst Byron’s best-known works are the brief poems She Walks in Beauty, When We Two Parted, and So, we’ll go no more a roving, in addition to the narrative poems Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage and Don Juan. He is regarded as one of the greatest British poets and remains widely read and influential, both in the English-speaking world and beyond.

Byron was born in a house on Holles Street in London. He was the son of Captain John ‘Mad Jack’ Byron and his second wife, the former Catherine Gordon, heiress of Gight in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Byron’s paternal grandparents were Vice-Admiral The Hon. John ‘Foulweather Jack’ Byron and Sophia Trevanion.[3] Vice Admiral John Byron had circumnavigated the globe, and was the younger brother of the 5th Baron Byron, known as “the Wicked Lord”.

He was christened George Gordon at St Marylebone Parish Church after his maternal grandfather, George Gordon of Gight, a descendant of King James I. This grandfather committed suicide[4] in 1779. Byron’s mother Catherine had to sell her land and title to pay her husband’s debts. John Byron may have married Catherine for her money[4] and, after squandering it, deserted her.[citation needed] Catherine regularly experienced mood swings and bouts of melancholy.[4]

Byron’s notability rests not only on his writings but also on his life, which featured aristocratic excesses, huge debts, numerous love affairs, and self-imposed exile. He was famously described by Lady Caroline Lamb as “mad, bad and dangerous to know”.[1

Byron’s original publishers, which had formerly withheld compromising letters and instructed at least one major biographer (Leslie A. Marchand, 1957) to censor details of his bisexuality.[12]

Byron’s first loves included Mary Duff and Margaret Parker, his distant cousins,[7] and Mary Chaworth, whom he met while at Harrow.[4] Byron later wrote that his passion for Duff began when he was “not [yet] eight years old,” and was still remembered in 1813.[7] Byron refused to return to Harrow in September 1803 because of his love for Chaworth; his mother wrote, “He has no indisposition that I know of but love, desperate love, the worst of all maladies in my opinion. In short, the boy is distractedly in love with Miss Chaworth.”[4] In Byron’s later memoirs, “Mary Chaworth is portrayed as the first object of his adult sexual feelings.”[14]

Byron returned to Harrow in January 1804,[4] to a more settled period which saw the formation of a circle of emotional involvements with other Harrow boys, which he recalled with great vividness: ‘My School friendships were with me passions (for I was always violent).’[15] The most enduring of those was with the John FitzGibbon, 2nd Earl of Clare — four years Byron’s junior — whom he was to meet unexpectedly many years later in Italy (1821).[16] His nostalgic poems about his Harrow friendships, ‘Childish Recollections’ (1806), express a sense of melancholy at the passing of youthful freedoms, even a prescient ‘consciousness of sexual differences that may in the end make England untenable to him.’[17]

“Ah! Sure some stronger impulse vibrates here,
Which whispers friendship will be doubly dear
To one, who thus for kindred hearts must roam,
And seek abroad, the love denied at home.”

While at Trinity, Byron met and formed a close friendship with the younger John Edleston. About his “protégé” he wrote, “He has been my almost constant associate since October, 1805, when I entered Trinity College. His voice first attracted my attention, his countenance fixed it, and his manners attached me to him for ever.” In his memory Byron composed Thyrza, a series of elegies.[18] Byron wore a ring of Edleston’s for the 13 years until he died.[18] In later years he described the affair as ‘a violent, though pure love and passion’. This however has to be read in the context of hardening public attitudes to homosexuality in England, and the severe sanctions (including public hanging) against convicted or even suspected offenders.[19] The liaison, on the other hand, may well have been ‘pure’ out of respect for Edleston’s innocence, in contrast to the (probably) more sexually overt relations experienced at Harrow School.[20]

Byron racked up numerous debts as a young man, due to what his mother termed a “reckless disregard for money”.[4] She lived at Newstead during this time, in fear of her son’s creditors.[4]

He had planned to spend early 1808 cruising with his cousin George Bettesworth, who was captain of the 32-gun frigate HMS Tartar. Bettesworth’s unfortunate death at the Battle of Alvøen in May 1808 made that impossible.

From 1809 to 1811, Byron went on the Grand Tour, then customary for a young nobleman. The Napoleonic Wars forced him to avoid most of Europe, and he instead turned to the Mediterranean. Correspondence among his circle of Cambridge friends also suggests that a key motive was the hope of homosexual experience,[21] and other theories saying that he was worried about a possible dalliance with the married Mary Chatsworth, his former love (the subject of his poem from this time, “To a Lady: On Being Asked My Reason for Quitting England in the Spring”).[7] Attraction to the Levant was probably a motive in itself; he had read about the Ottoman and Persian lands as a child, was attracted to Islam (especially Sufi mysticism), and later wrote, “With these countries, and events connected with them, all my really poetical feelings begin and end.”[22

Of Byron…His whole life was deflected from its course, and thrown out of gear: first, by his unhappy passion for Mary Chaworth; secondly by the way women of all ranks, flattering his vanity for the gratification of their own, importuned them with the offer of their hearts. Lady Byron herself did so no less than Lady Caroline Lamb, and Jane Clairmont, and the Venetian light o’ loves, though no doubt, with more delicacy and a better show of maidenly reserve. Fully persuaded in her own mind that he had pined for her for two years, she delicately hinted to him that he need pine no longer.  He took the hint and married her, with catastrophic consequences which we know.” (The Love Affairs of Lord Byron by Francis Henry Gribble)

  1. 1765
    Jan 26, 1765 – On 26 January 1765, Lord Byron killed his cousin and neighbor, William Chaworth, in a duel at the Stars and Garters Tavern in London. The fight resulted from an argument the two had been engaged in, allegedly over the best method in which to hang game. Lord On 26 January 1765, Lord Byron killed his cousin and neighbor, William Chaworth, in a duel at the Stars and Garters Tavern in London. The fight resulted from an argument the two had been engaged in, allegedly over the best method in which to hang game. Lord Byron and his cousin retired to a dim room to resolve their disagreement and it was there that Lord Byron thrust his sword through Chaworth’s stomach.


    From William Byron, 5th Baron Byron: Information from Answers.comRelated web pages
    http://www.answers.com/topic/william-byron-5th-baron

  2. 1788
    Jan 22, 1788 – Lord Byron, A Life Full Of Passions For many, Lord Byron is a famous poet. But besides that, George Gordon Byron was a disconcerting character: extravagant, interesting, and also a very advanced man for his times. Lord Byron was born in London, on January 22, 1788….
    From Discover – Recent ActivityRelated web pages
    http://www.stumbleupon.com/discover/byron/

  3. 1809
    1809 – Here is a case in which an apparition was touched and felt, quoted from Moore’s Life of Byron. Lord Byron, who sailed with Captain Ridd to Lisbon in 1809, says that the Captain narrated to him the following occurrence:—. This officer stated that, being asleep Lord Byron, who sailed with Captain Ridd to Lisbon in 1809, says that the Captain narrated to him the following occurrence:—. This officer stated that, being asleep one night in his berth, he was awakened by the pressure of something heavy on his limbs ; and there being a faint light in the cabin, could see, as he thought, distinctly the figure of his brother, who was at that time in the naval service, in the East Indies, dressed in his uniform, and stretched across the bed.

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    From Spirits before our eyes
    books.google.com/books?id=WzgCAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA59 …

  4. 1812
    1812 – In 1812, Lady Caroline met Lord Byron at a party and fell madly in love with him . They had a passionate affair, but when Byron ended it, Lady Caroline became obsessed with him, showing up everywhere he went. Lady Melbourne pushed Lord Byron away from her In 1812, Lady Caroline met Lord Byron at a party and fell madly in love with him . They had a passionate affair, but when Byron ended it, Lady Caroline became obsessed with him, showing up everywhere he went. Lady Melbourne pushed Lord Byron away from her high-strung daughter-in-law but then brokered his unsuccessful marriage to her niece to try and break his incestuous relationship with his half-sister, Augusta.

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    From BBC – Cult – Tamara – WeblogsRelated web pages
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/tamaraswift/help/clue2.shtml

  5. 1815
    Dec 10, 1815 – Born on 10th December 1815, Augusta Ada Byron was the only legitimate child of the poet Lord Byron and his wife, Annabella Milbanke. But she was never to know her father because Lord and Lady Byron separated when Ada was just five weeks old. During the Born on 10th December 1815, Augusta Ada Byron was the only legitimate child of the poet Lord Byron and his wife, Annabella Milbanke. But she was never to know her father because Lord and Lady Byron separated when Ada was just five weeks old. During the ensuing judicial separation proceedings, Annabella was granted sole custody of the baby and brought her up at the Milbanke ancestral home in Kirkby Mallory, Leicestershire. Ada Byron’s Gift for Mathematics.


    From … of Augusta Ada Lovelace, Nee Byron: Mathematical Genius Credited as …Related web pages
    great-scientists.suite101.com/article.cfm …

  6. 1816
    Jan 1816 – In January 1816, as the Byrons passed their first anniversary, Lord Byron suggested they sell the house at Piccadilly Terrace. He recommended that Lady Byron take Ada to her parents’ home and stay there temporarily until he settled their finances. In In January 1816, as the Byrons passed their first anniversary, Lord Byron suggested they sell the house at Piccadilly Terrace. He recommended that Lady Byron take Ada to her parents’ home and stay there temporarily until he settled their finances. In disbelief, Annabella sought medical advice as she had become convinced her husband had gone mad. She invited a physician to their home to assess Byron. Byron was unaware of the true purpose for the visit. The doctor

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    From Anne Isabella Byron, Baroness Byron: Information from Answers.comRelated web pages
    http://www.answers.com/topic/anne-isabella-byron

  7. 1819
    Apr 1, 1819 – “The Vampyre” was first published on April 1, 1819, by Colburn in the New Monthly Magazine with the false attribution “A Tale by Lord Byron.” The name of the work’s protagonist, “Lord Ruthven“, added to this assumption, for that name was originally used in “The Vampyre” was first published on April 1, 1819, by Colburn in the New Monthly Magazine with the false attribution “A Tale by Lord Byron.” The name of the work’s protagonist, “Lord Ruthven“, added to this assumption, for that name was originally used in Lady Caroline Lamb’s novel Glenarvon, in which a thinly- disguised Byron figure was also named Lord Ruthven. Despite repeated denials by Byron and Polidori, the authorship often went unclarified.

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    From The VampyreRelated web pages
    books.google.com/books?id=k1VY81IOnpUC&pg=PR7 …

  8. 1821
    1821 – Mcdwin’s book, and in a “Narrative f Lord Byron’s Voyage to Sicily, Corsica, and Sardinia, in 1821, in the Mazeppa.” It s melancholy to observe how little faith an be put in any thing published to gratify lublic curiosity. Mr Shelley, who is rc- rarted to Since our previous notices of this nobleman, Mr Hobhouse has published a pamphlet n contradiction to many circumstances in ‘:ipt. Mcdwin’s book, and in a “Narrative f Lord Byron’s Voyage to Sicily, Corsica, and Sardinia, in 1821, in the Mazeppa.” It s melancholy to observe how little faith an be put in any thing published to gratify lublic curiosity. Mr Shelley, who is rc- rarted to have been converted in a storm t sea, on board Lord Byron’s yacht, “the lazeppa,” is proved

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    From The United States Literary Gazette
    books.google.com/books?id=6-wRAAAAYAAJ&pg …

  9. 1822
    1822 – Byron added it to his and became George Gordon Noel Byron in 1822. He also added it to his signature. So – George Gordon (Noel) Byron, Lord Byron, Sixth Baron Byron of Rochdale. No-one ever called him George after he became Byron – not even his mother.Byron added it to his and became George Gordon Noel Byron in 1822. He also added it to his signature. So – George Gordon (Noel) Byron, Lord Byron, Sixth Baron Byron of Rochdale. No-one ever called him George after he became Byron – not even his mother. He is not Lord George Gordon Byron as this designates the younger brother of a Lord (like Lord John Russell).

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    From Lord Byron FAQ: Lord Byron’s Pages (Byronmania)Related web pages
    www3.telus.net/strawberryjamm/byronmania/byron …

  10. 1824
    Apr 19, 1824 – He died on April 19, 1824. Other Romantic contemporaries included Percy Shelley and John Keats (both of these Romantic died young, like Lord Byron). Read more about Byron’s life with The Life of Lord Byron, by John Galt. Also read the poetry of Lord Famous for his outrageous and controversial behavior, Byron wrote passionate poetry that included works like “Don Juan,” “Manfred,” “Marino Faliero,” ” Sardanapalus,” “The Two Foscari,” and “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage.” He died on April 19, 1824. Other Romantic contemporaries included Percy Shelley and John Keats (both of these Romantic died young, like Lord Byron). Read more about Byron’s life with The Life of Lord Byron, by John Galt. Also read the poetry of

    From Google timelines


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